What are some of the terms that you will run across when you start to collect stamps?

Not too long ago, I went to a local auction that had quite a few stamps for sale.  There were some stamp collectors and dealers there talking about “changelings” and even an “album weed”.  It made me think—what are some of the terms that you’ll run across when you collect stamps?

Album weed—this refers to a forged stamp, and it also refers to unusual items that resemble postage stamps but were not intended to pay postage.  This is something like publicity labels and bogus issues.

Album Weeds—this is the title of a reference book series that is on forged stamps.  It was written by R.B. Earee.

Changeling—this is a stamp whose color has been changed (either intentionally or unintentionally) by contact with a chemical.  This can also happen with the exposure to a light.

Encased postage stamp—this is a stamp that was inserted into a small coin-size case.  The case comes with a transparent front or back to see the stamp.  These were circulated as legal coins during periods when coins were scarce in the 1860’s.

Handstamp—this is a cancellation or overprint that was applied by hand to either a cover or to a stamp.

Obliteration—there are two main definitions for this term.  The first is a cancellation that was intended solely to deface a stamp (this is also called a killer).  The second is an overprint intended to deface a portion of the design of a stamp (such as the face of a deposed ruler).

This is just a few of what you’ll hear when talking about stamps.  What terms have you heard?

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A good example of Czechoslovakian pottery

Pottery from the Czechoslovakian area in Europe is a great area to dive into and collect.  You can find great examples starting in the $10 to $15 area, and you can also find examples that are priced much higher.

You can find a wide variety of pieces on the market—cups, saucers, figurines, pitchers, creamers, sugars and even plates are a very small slice of what you can find.

One type of Czechoslovakian pottery (also called Czech pottery, a shortened name of the region it’s from) is this terrific hat pin holder from a company called ROYAL DUX.

royal dux

It was made from 1918 to 1930’s, and it has a cream background and a red trim, and it also has an embossed flower motif with pastel colors.

Royal dux marks

The marks that are on it are the DPM mark with an acorn at the center (this stands for DUXER PORZELLAN-MANUFAKTUR), and it also has an embossed mark that reads 11259 II (these marks help date the hat pin holder from 1918 to the 1930’s).

The hatpin holder is also the perfect size to be used as a small vase (or even a bud vase).  It would also look terrific on any table or even a desk.  It would definitely be the center of attention in any room that it’s in!

The vase can be seen in my Etsy shop here.  Head on over and check it out!

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: Jenscloset

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is Jenscloset that’s run by Jen.

Jen loves vintage as you might be able to tell, and she loves to fill her shop with something for everyone.  Whether you’re looking for that unique-one-of-a-kind gift, adding some retro style to your decor, or love vintage jewelry, you’ll find it all in the Jenscloset shop.

One thing that you will find is this set of 5 sherbets.

burple

The five vibrant emerald green and crystal Anchor Hocking sherbets have the Burple pattern, and they can also be used as champagne glasses.  You can find these in the Jenscloset shop here.

Another great item in this shop is this set of mixing bowls.

burple 1

Step back in time with this fun retro set of three Pyrex bowls!  This set includes 1 yellow 4 quart bowl, 1 green 2 1/2 quart bowl, and 1 red (vibrant!) 1 1/2 quart bowl.  You can see this terrific set in the shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the Jenscloset shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

A cross between a cigar humidor and a…FURNACE?!?

There are times when you actually stop and scratch your head when you run across an item, and this is definitely one of those times.  Have you ever seen a cross between a cigar humidor and a furnace?

Yep, you saw that right—this piece is a cross between a cigar humidor and a furnace.

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This enamelware piece is made as a cigar humidor and is decorated as a furnace.  You could also say that this is a great salesman’s sample for LISLET FURNACE (the company that made the furnaces was based in Quebec, Canada).

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The great thing about this item is the fact that you could use it a number of different ways—as a pencil holder, change holder, or even a container for the kitchen.  The uses can go on and on!

You can see the cigar humidor in the Etsy shop of Wisdom Lane Antiques here.  Head on over and check it out!

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: CrookedJoesAntiques

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is CrookedJoesAntiques that’s run by Ted and Vanessa Osborn.

Vanessa says that 19 years ago her husband asked her when she was going to stop dragging old stuff home (he asked her this as he was dragging old stuff home). Her reply was that she would probably always be dragging old stuff home. Subsequently, the two opened an antique store.

Books and glassware were Vanessa’s early passions, but of course that expanded. The two deal in everything; books, glassware, primitives, automotive, jewelry, sports collectibles and they love everything metal.

Crooked Joe’s is a combination of both of their tastes so you will find feminine and manly and everything in between.

One item is this cool cigarette dispenser.

dispenser

A company named Kindel and Graham from Mission Street in San Francisco produced these wood cigarette dispensers in the 1920’s.  You can see this in their shop here.  Another item you can find in the CrookedJoesAntiques shop is this cool egg separator.

seperator

The lime green separator dates to the 1960’s, and I love the little lip on the end so you can safely set it on the edge of a bowl.  You can see this in their shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the CrookedJoesAntiques shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: LaKimonoya

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is LaKimonoya that’s run by Isabelle.

The first time Isabelle came to Japan, she fell in love with the local flea markets, kimonos, haoris, kakemonos.  She loves Japanese vintage items, their uniqueness in color, touch and designs.  Isabelle has lived in Japan for few years now and feels very lucky that enjoying those became a part of their daily life!

One of the items in the LaKimonoya shop is this terrific Japanese long Kimono.

japanese long Kimono, wine red leaf pattern

I love the wine red leaf pattern that is on it, and you can see this terrific item in their shop here.  Another great item in the LaKimonoya shop is this great Lacquered Wood Lunch Box.

Jubako Lacquered Wood Lunch Box

This great 1970’s lacquered wood lunch box was originally aimed for festive food presentation (something like New Year’s celebrations or even for a wedding).  It could also be great storing little treasures, and you can see it in their shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the LaKimonoya shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

Sulfide marbles—what exactly are they?

Cats Eye, Steelies, and Latticino Core are all different types of marbles that you’ll run across.  One of my favorite type of marble is what’s called a sulfide.

Sulfide marbles were made from the late 1800’s into the early 1900’s.  More often than not, they are the size of a shooter.  This type of marble is made of glass with a chalk inside–and that piece comes in a wide variety of shapes from an animals, buildings, people, flowers and even numbers.

Sulphide Shooter Marble With Lamb

The most common type of glass that you’ll see is clear, but different colors like green and blue have been found.

There are some things that you need to remember when you are either starting to collect these.  Since this was a shooter (and sulfides were actually played with), there is a very good chance that there will be some surface chips or cracks in the marble.

Another thing to remember is that the chalk piece was inserted into molten glass when these were made.  The chalk piece stands a good chance of breaking in half when the marble is made.

Beware though—there are modern varieties of sulfides out on the market.  It’s easy to tell the old from the new marbles when you are looking at them.  The quality of the glass and chalk figure are of a better quality on the new marbles.  Pay attention to the chalk piece itself—it’s almost always painted on the new ones too.

What kinds of Sulfide marbles have you run across?