Vintage furniture pieces that you may not run across everyday

When you are out and about shopping for vintage items, you will run across some vintage furniture that you may not know what it is.  Here’s a couple of pieces that you might run across:

Tallboy—this is a piece of furniture that incorporates a chest of drawers with a wardrobe on top.  The tallboy was considered to be the wardrobe of the 1700’s.

Highboy—this is a piece of furniture that consists of a double chest of drawers (it’s also known as a chest-on-chest).  This piece of furniture has a lower section that is usually wider than the upper section.

Pie safe—this is also referred to as a pie cabinet, pie safe cupboard, or even a pie chest.  It is a piece of furniture that is typically used to store pies.  The cabinet will have sections that consist of either pierced metal or screen to help the pies cool.  In the past, some people also stored meat, perishables, and other items inside of their pie safes.

Hoosier cabinet—this is also known simply as a “Hoosier”.  It is a type of cupboard (or even a free–standing kitchen cabinet) that also serves as a workstation.  It was popular in the first few decades of the 1900’s.  This was because most of the houses did not have built–in kitchen cabinetry.

This is just a few of the vintage furniture pieces that you may not run across everyday.  What other pieces have you run across?

Advertisements

When you are selling online, what is the best policy to have about returns?

Whenever you sell items online, something will happen to where a customer will want a refund (or even to return something).

I have seen a wide variety of refund and return policies over the years when I have shopped online on different sites.  There are sellers that do not give a refund at all, and I have also seen sellers not give refunds on items like clothes or electronics.

So what is the best policy to have on giving a refund? Do you not give them or only after you have them after the item is returned? Do you only give a partial one if the item is broken?

Eva from the evaelena shop says that It has only happened to them a couple of times over the years.  They give very clear descriptions of the item -faults and all which helps people make an informed decision in purchasing.  If the item breaks in transit- then Eva takes responsibility for not packing it correctly.  If it is a fault they have missed when listing, they also offer them a partial refund if they want to keep it (or a full refund including their shipping costs if they want to send it back to her).  If it is smashed completely then it’s a full refund.

Amy And Sean from Pistilbooks accept returns within 14 days for a full refund for any reason.  The buyer pays the return shipping unless the item was not as described.

John from Wisdom Lane Antiques has a policy that states that if you ship it back to them within 7 days of you receiving it, then you will receive a full refund.

This is just a few examples of return policies.  What type of policy works best for you as a seller?

READER’S HELP: that’s a friendly wall-crawling superhero…made from plaster?

When you start to dive into the world of antiques and collectibles, you quickly find out that you will find really cool things in unexpected places.

Not too long ago, this happened to me when I came upon a local garage sale.  And do you know what was there?  Just a bust of Spiderman himself!

Spiderman bank (1)

As you can see in the photo, the bust is made of plaster and it is also doubles as a bank (the coin slot is on the back of Spiderman’s head).  Not only that, it is extremely detailed—you can see and feel the ribbing in Spiderman’s mask, and it also feels like the head actually has cloth on it.

Spiderman bank (2)

Here’s the problem that I have with the bank—I know what it is, but I have no idea who made it.  I was told that it was made in Mexico, but there is no maker’s mark or even a country of origin mark on it.

Does anyone know who could have made this great bank?  Could it be a homemade piece that a fan of the character made?

Any information is greatly appreciated!

What are some of the different colors of glass that you will run across?

It will not take long for you to run across a wide variety of colors that you will find on glass.  There are so many in fact that the variety will make your head spin!  Here’s a couple of colors that you will find when out shopping for antiques:

Burmese glass—this is a type of colored art glass that shades from yellow to pink.  Burmese glass is found in either the rare original “shiny” finish or the more common “satin” finish.  Burmese is a uranium glass—the uranium is to help with the color of a piece, and it will glow bright green under a black light.

Carnival glass—carnival glass is a molded or pressed glass.  It always is found with a pattern and always has a shiny, metallic iridescent finish to the surface.

Black Amethyst–black amethyst glass appears to be a black color until it is held to a bright light source.  Once held to a light source, you will then be able to see a dark color.  The glass has been made in many factories from 1860 to the present.

Millefiori Glass—this is an Italian word meaning “a thousand flowers.” This commonly refers to glass items that are made from a lot of murrini slices.

This is only a small portion of the assorted colors of glass on the market.  What have you run across?

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: ancienesthetique

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is the ancienesthetique shop.  They sell French country home vintage, and even French decor antiques.

The great people that run ancienesthetique found themselves in  France after arriving there via South America with no money and not much more of a plan.  They were suddenly surrounded by gorgeous old treasures which they had to sell on and share!

It all started with gorgeous little antique cups, buttons, laces, scarves, all smaller items.  It has definitely grown from there.

They go to vide greniers, (empty attic) or brocantes, antique fairs and marche aux puces (flea markets) that are here there and everywhere.  Some of the terrific items that the ancienesthetique shop has can be found on Etsy, and one such item is this great pair of porcelain cups.

cups

The lot of 2 Limoges tea, coffee or espresso cups date to the 1940’s.  Thye would make a superb and unique mothers day gift!  You can find them in their shop here.

Another great item in the ancienesthetique shop is therrific alarm clock,

clock

What a sweet little Jaz alarm clock!  This wind up Vintage alarm clock dates to the 1940’s and would be an excellent gift for him or a housewarming gift.  You can find it in the ancienesthetique shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the ancienesthetique shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

What are some of the glassware colors called that you will run across?

When I started selling glassware, I quickly found out that any glassware that had color to it sold better than its crystal counterpart.  Opalescent glass, forest green and amberina glass were colors that I have heard, but what exactly are they?  Here’s a description of some of the more common glass colors that you will hear:

Amberina glass—this is a type of art glass that has a color that goes from amber (or even a yellow color) to ruby on the same piece.  This shaded effect is due to the gold being added to the glass when it is being made.

Cameo glass—this is a type of glass that has layers of glass that have contrasting colors.  The outer layers are either acid-etched, carved, cut, or even engraved to produce a design.  Since the layers are different colors, this will help the design stand out from the background.

Opal glass—this is glass that resembles an opal.  Opal glass will be a translucent and white, and it will also have a grayish or bluish tinge to it.

Cranberry glass—this is a type of glass that is made by adding gold salts or colloidal gold to molten glass (tin is sometimes added as a reducing agent), and this makes the glass turn a pink color.

This is only a small example of some of the glassware colors that you will run across when you are out shopping.  What colors have you run across?

What are some of the terms that you will run across when you start to collect stamps?

Not too long ago, I went to a local auction that had quite a few stamps for sale.  There were some stamp collectors and dealers there talking about “changelings” and even an “album weed”.  It made me think—what are some of the terms that you’ll run across when you collect stamps?

Album weed—this refers to a forged stamp, and it also refers to unusual items that resemble postage stamps but were not intended to pay postage.  This is something like publicity labels and bogus issues.

Album Weeds—this is the title of a reference book series that is on forged stamps.  It was written by R.B. Earee.

Changeling—this is a stamp whose color has been changed (either intentionally or unintentionally) by contact with a chemical.  This can also happen with the exposure to a light.

Encased postage stamp—this is a stamp that was inserted into a small coin-size case.  The case comes with a transparent front or back to see the stamp.  These were circulated as legal coins during periods when coins were scarce in the 1860’s.

Handstamp—this is a cancellation or overprint that was applied by hand to either a cover or to a stamp.

Obliteration—there are two main definitions for this term.  The first is a cancellation that was intended solely to deface a stamp (this is also called a killer).  The second is an overprint intended to deface a portion of the design of a stamp (such as the face of a deposed ruler).

This is just a few of what you’ll hear when talking about stamps.  What terms have you heard?