Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: KitschyVintage

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is KitschyVintage that’s run by Anne.

Anne began collecting as soon as she could walk.  It started with pretty rocks (what kid doesn’t like those?) and toads & salamanders, but quickly graduated to penny machine prizes (remember rat-finks?), trolls and comic books.

She has always loved old things, old stories, family history (her husband calls it ‘ancestor worship’) and the link that vintage and antique things have to the past.

Anne loves to go to flea markets, estate sales, thrift shops and the occasional curb-side.  She’s not above dumpster-diving and should have a bumper sticker that reads ‘I Brake for Other People’s Trash’!  Often the cast-off and forgotten hides a nugget of wonderful-ness that just needs to be found.

One of those great nuggets is this great plastic cheese server with Mouse handle on the top.

Plastic Cheese Server with Mouse Metal Handles Covered Cheese Tray

The cheese server dates to the 1960’s, and it can be found in the KitschyVintage shop here.  Another great item in Anne’s shop is this great Vintage Androck Whipper with a glass jar.

Vintage Androck Whipper in Glass Jar

The Whipper dates from the 1930’s to the 1940’s and would be great for making cream, mayonnaise or even beating eggs.  You can see it in the shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the KitschyVintage shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

Getting out of your comfort zone can be a good thing

When you are buying items to sell either online or in your shop, getting a little out of your comfort zone can be a good thing.

What do I exactly mean by this?  This could be considering an item when you know absolutely nothing about it.  If it’s cheap enough, you could go ahead and buy it so that you can learn something and earn a little of a profit when you sell it.

It could be anything, really.  It could be a book, a piece of Fiesta pottery, a Fenton glassware piece or even an advertising piece.

When I started to sell items, I knew absolutely nothing about clothing (except for what I found at Walmart).  After a while, I had a decent working knowledge of what brand names are out on the market.  Not only that, I now offer a wide variety of clothing from earrings and necklaces to prom dresses and even designer shoes.

So keep an eye out—you may find something today that you can learn from!  What kinds of items have you run across like this?

There are many different types of tables to consider decorating with

Dinner tables, coffee tables and even side tables can be seen in pretty much every house nowadays.  Did you know there are many, many different types of tables that you can decorate your house or apartment with?  Here’s a few for you to consider:

Flip-top table—This is a table that has two leaves, and the leaves are one on top of the other.

Pie-crust table—This is a small, round table having a top with its edge carved or molded in scallops. This type of table is common in 18th-century English furniture.

Gate-leg table—A gate-leg table is a type of table that was first introduced in England in the 16th century. The table top has a fixed section and one or two hinged leaves on the sides.  This type of table also has two legs that swing out to hold the leaves up.  When the leaves are not in use, the legs fold in and the leaves fold down below the fixed section and hang vertically.

This is just a small sampling of what’s out there.  What kinds of tables have you run across or have used?

What style is that?

When I started to sell vintage and antique items, I immediately heard some names of the styles of design that have been used over the years.  The first area that I found out that this applies to is furniture.  Here’s a brief explanation of some of the styles:

Queen Anne—this is a period in English furniture design that dates from 1702 to 1714.  This style is characterized by the adaptation of the Baroque style and the extensive use of the cabriole leg.  Walnut was the dominant wood used by furniture makers.

Renaissance—this is a revival of interest in classical design.  This style had it’s beginning in Italy during the 14th century, and it continued to spread throughout Europe until the 17th century.  The design is simple in structure—it has a generous use of classical ornament (such as the acanthus leaf, animal forms, and pilasters).

Georgian—this is a period of design in English furniture that was used right after the Queen Anne style, and it ran from 1714 to 1795.  Some of the better-known designers were Hepplewhite, Sheraton, Chippendale, and even the Adams Brothers.  Mahogany and walnut were the chief woods used by furniture makers (but other woods have been known to be used).

This is only a small sample of the styles that are out there.  What types of styles have you heard about?

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: Kultur

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is Kultur based in Carmel Valley, California.

Kultur is the Etsy shop of two European transplants to California’s Central Coast.  One is a finder and describer, the other is the shipper when not functioning as a feeder of beasties.

Kultur is the word for ‘culture’ in German and most Scandinavian languages.  The shop examines the treasures of culture past. The goodies that are special enough to make us smile or even grin are presented in their shop.  Sometimes it almost feels like they are an adoption agency finding new homes for orphaned vintage items.

One of these great items is this great silk scarf.

VERA

The scarf was made in the 1950’s by VERA, and I love the orange and gold color on it.  You can see the scarf in their shop here.  Another great find in the Kultur shop is great book from the 1910’s.

Uncle Wigglys airship

The book is titled “Uncle Wiggily’s Airship” and was written by Howard R. Garis.  This copy is a first edition, and the book can be seen in their shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the Kultur shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

Two Cents worth? Yep.

Did you know that there was actually a 2 cent coin that was produced by the United States mint?

2 cent coin
Photo is courtesy of Wikipedia.com

The Two Cent piece officially ran from 1864 to 1872, but there was a copy made for collectors in 1873.

The economic turmoil of the American Civil War caused any and all government-issued coins to vanish from circulation, they were hoarded very heavily by the public. Even the Indian Head cent—which was made of bronze—was pretty much gone from circulation.  The Coinage Act Of 1864 authorized the cent to switch to a bronze composition and the production of the Two Cent coin.

Even though there were other mints actively producing coins at the time, this coin was only produced at the mint based in Philadelphia.  What this means is that there will not be a mint mark anywhere–which is the way this mint was marking the coins until 1980.

Two of the more famous die varieties happened in 1864.  One is called the “large motto,” and the other is called the “small motto.”  These two varieties deal with the motto, “In God We Trust.”  The words IN, GOD, and TRUST has some small differences, while the word WE has the most differences.  It all hinges on the size of it, and it is very noticeable.  The WE on “large motto” is larger than the WE on the “small motto.”

 

2 cent coin large motto
This is the LARGE MOTTO variety, the photo is courtesy of Wikipedia.com
2 cent coin small motto
This is the SMALL MOTTO variety, the photo is courtesy of Wikipedia.com

The “small motto” is much scarcer than the “large motto.”  The best idea is to keep an eye out for it in case you might walk across a case full of coins at a mall, or happen to be at a coin shop or show.

Have you seen one of these really cool coins?

Shipping practices as an online seller

Over the years, I’ve bought quite a few items on Etsy and on other selling sites. The sellers have quite a few different policies on shipping. It could be shipping the same day you buy it, and I have seen sellers take what they sell to the post office only once a week.

So here’s my question: what’s the best policy to have when it comes to shipping? Is it one trip to the post office a day or even once a week?

Bill and Kerry Atkins from the BatnKatArtifacts shop say they used to ship in 3-5 business days and make bi-weekly trips to the post office, which is 12 miles away. About a year ago, they changed their policy to ship within 1-2 business days. At the same time, they started scheduling free package pickups with USPS during regular delivery. Best decision ever! Not only has this their boosted sales, but it has also reduced their stress level tremendously. Customers love the fast turnaround as well.

The stonebridgeworks shop says that they’re on a rural route but we’re very close to town. They can get a fairly large package in their big mailbox or take it to the Post Office if they are going that way.  They try to ship on the same day so having boxes ready is important. They often use USPS flat-rate or their 7×7 and 12×12 shipping boxes. You can order all of these in bulk online and that saves time and hassle.

When I sell an item through the Wisdom Lane Antiques shop (either here on Etsy or other sites), I try to ship it within a day so that it can get to the buyer as fast as possible (even if it means handing it to the post man when he drops off my mail).

You can also see more shipping practices from more Etsy Vintage Team members here.  What works for you when you sell an item online?