What you need to know when you set up an antique booth

You start to look around the house and you notice that you have quite a few things that you have collected that you now want to sell.  You know that the items are too expensive for a garage sale, and you don’t have the time to list the items for sale online.

What do you do now?

A booth in an antique mall or a flea market is a wonderful way to help you make some money and clear out some of those things that you have around the house.  There are some things that you need to know before for jump into renting a booth.

The first thing you need to do is to find the perfect place for you to set up a booth at.  This could be at a place that you love to shop at or even heard of.  The best thing to keep in mind is to see if that place has a pretty good amount of foot traffic going through it.  This will help you have more potential sales.

Another thing you need to know is if the antique mall or flea market requires you to stay a certain amount of time.  It’s rare for this to happen in the area that I live in–you can shut down the booth after just one month if you want to.

More often than not, you will need to pay for your first month’s rent on the booth.  I’ve seen the rent cost anywhere from $35 for a small booth or showcase all the way up to $300 for a large booth.

The place that you want to rent a booth at may charge you a commission on every item you sell.  You need to ask if they do, and even how much the commission is (I’ve seen it around 10% of the selling price of the item).

You might be able to opt out of the commission; the mall might charge you a little more on the rent of the booth to cover this commission.

The mall will require you to have a number—this will help the mall separate out who sold what.  This will be done the day that you set up the booth, but don’t worry—the mall will have a list of what numbers the other dealers have so there is no confusion.

A word of advice—look to see what kind of tags the dealers are using (a piece of tape may not be wanted at the mall).  One thing that I have seen a lot of is a piece of paper cut into a small square tied on with twine or ribbon.

Good luck and lots of sales to you!

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What are some of the benefits of getting an item appraised?

You have a piece of jewelry from your grandmother, your dad’s vintage comic book collection from his youth, or even a piece of furniture that you picked up at an antique mall.  You know that the piece has value, and you are not sure if you want to get an appraisal on it.

What are some of the benefits of getting an item appraised?

There are several benefits when it comes to getting an appraisal.  The first reason (and probably best) is that it helps tell you the value of the item that you have.

The second reason is that it helps clear up any confusion on what the item is.  You could have heard several stories from the family, and each story identifies the item (or items) completely differently than what it actually is.

Another reason is that the appraisal helps you know if your item is real or not.  A good rule of thumb is to try to find someone who appraises items on a regular basis like what you have.  This will help with both the value and authenticity of the piece that you have.

When it comes to jewelry, the appraiser has equipment that helps determine what the types of stones that you could possibly have.

Another good benefit on appraisals is that you could also get everything written out telling what the item is.  This will also help with insurance (if it’s needed on the item).

What other types of benefits have you run across when you got an appraisal on an item you have?

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: SecondHandNews

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is SecondHandNews that’s run by Michelle.

Michelle absolutely loves Shabby Chic and Country Cottage decor; particularly that which includes Robin’s Egg Blue, Pink or Barnwood Red – some of her favorite colors. Her work consists of primarily reworked pieces that she’s painted, distressed and transformed in some way.

Michelle also has an obsession with Vintage things whether it be home decor items or books. She’s always up for a trip to the Flea Market or an Estate Sale and loves to share her beautiful finds with all of you.

One of these great finds is this cool mustard tin.

Coleman's mustard

This tin is for Colman’s Mustard, and it dates to the 1970’s.  It still contains mustard, although I wouldn’t recommend using it.  You can see this great tin in their shop here.

Another great item in the SecondHandNews shop is this great wire memo board.

memo board

This great shabby cottage chic chicken wire memo board is made from a distressed picture frame and chicken wire, and I love the polymer clay rose applique attached to the top.

You can see this great item in the SecondHandNews shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the SecondHandNews shop here.  Head on over and check them out!

Here’s some fun facts about PEZ dispensers

One of the things that I remember having around during my childhood is a PEZ dispenser.  The Hulk, Garfield and even Spiderman were some of the dispensers that I had, and nothing could beat that cherry flavored candy.

PEZ candy was first produced in Vienna, Austria in 1927.  The candy was first advertised as a compressed peppermint sweet, and PEZ is actually an abbreviation for PfeffErminZ (that’s German for peppermint).  These candies came in a tin that looks like what Altoids come in today.

When the dispensers came about, they were not always called that.  They were called “regulars”, and they looked a lot like a cigarette lighter.  They dispensed an adult breath mint that were marketed as an alternative to smoking.

When 1955 rolled around, the dispensers started to have character heads on them, and this happened after PEZ was introduced in the United States.  One example of these character heads is this POLICEMAN dispenser.

pez man

As you can see, the dispenser should have a police hat on it, but has been lost over time.  Over the years, PEZ has made dispensers with and without feet.

pez feet

As you can tell from the picture above this great example has no feet, and the dispenser date to 1968.

What kind of PEZ dispensers have you had?

Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight: BumpedandBruised

This week’s Etsy Vintage Team Store Highlight is BumpedandBruised that’s run by Mallory Knox.

Mallory Knox loves to sell perfectly imperfect vintage in her shop called bumpedandbruised.  She like misfits with flaws, loner salt and pepper shakers, chippy ceramics and snagged linens….

She says that everything has a story, and she likes that story to be told over and over again.

One of these great items that’s in her shop is this great Graniteware Set.

graniteware set

This great set is was made by General Steel Wares (also known as GSW).  The set features a 1/2 gallon and 1 pint sizes, and they date to the 1920’s.  The set can be seen in the bumpedandbruised shop here.

Another great item in Mallory’s shop is this fun bowl (or even a candy dish).

candy dish

This rare curling stone bowl or candy dish was made by Blue Mountain Pottery in the 1970’s.  I love the handle on the lid, and you can see this great item in Mallory’s shop here.

As a matter of fact, you can check out everything in the bumpedandbruised shop here.

Head on over and check them out!

Look at all the assorted colors that glass has been produced with!

When you look at the area of glassware, you will see many different colors and finishes that the glass was made with.  There are as many distinct color combinations as there are manufacturing techniques.  Here’s a few of them that you will most likely run across:

Cased Glass—this is glass of one color that has been covered with one or more layers of assorted colors. The outer layers are then acid-etched, carved, cut, or even engraved to produce a design.  This design will stand out from the background, and will have a kind of raised motif when done. The first cameo glasses were made by the Romans in ancient times, and the genre was revived in England and America (to a lesser amount) in the late 19th century.

Flashed Glass—this is glass that has one color with a very thin applied color on the outside (like crystal glass that has a cranberry color applied to it).  This technique is accomplished by applying a chemical compound to the glass and then re-firing the piece to bring out the desired color.  Flashed glass is often used for etched glass (the flashing will be applied after the etching is completed).

Gilding—this is the process of decorating glass using gold leaf, gold paint, or even gold dust. There are examples that have the gilding applied with mercury (it’s called Mercury Gilding.  It’s rarely done today due to its toxicity).  The gilding is then usually attached to the glass by heat.

Peachblow—this is a type of Art Glass made by quite a few American factories in the late 1800’s.  Most Peachblow glass has a coloring that shaded from an opaque cream to pink (or even red), sometimes even over an opaque white.  There was a similar glass that was made in England (it was by Thomas Webb & Sons and even Stevens & Williams).

This is only a small sampling of what has been made.  What kinds of colored glass have you run across?

What exactly is the ART DECO style?

You hear the phrase ART DECO quite a bit in the world of antiques, but what exactly is it?

Art Deco got its start in France just before World War 1, and the style ran from about 1910 to about 1939.

Philips_930
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

People also call Art Deco just Deco, and it’s short for Arts Decoratifs.  It combined several assorted styles—it was influenced by the lines of Cubism, the bright colors of Fauvism (this was a painting style) and even exotic styles from Asia.  Persian, Egypt styles and even Maya art had some influence on the Art Deco style.

club chair
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Its influence could be seen on just about everything—buildings, furniture, jewelry, cars, fashion, trains and even everyday items like toasters.

You can see the style around today—you can see it on buildings like the Chrysler Building in New York.

chrysler building
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

And you can even see it on the Prometheus Statue in Rockefeller Center in New York.

prometheus
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

What kinds of Art Deco items have you run across while shopping?